Crystallizing Method

This is a very long entry. I think I may move it to its own page after a couple of days, so it won’t overwhelm the rest of the journal.

In one of Mike Johnston’s first installments (http://www.luminous-landscape.com/columns/sm-02-04-31.shtml) of his column Sunday Morning, he writes that working methods are the most important thing that photographers never talk about. He then seems to stop talking about them in almost all subsequent columns. Go figure.

11 min read

Formulae

Three rolls Delta 400, 11.5mins Xtol 1::1 @ 20C

Got my new bulkroll of TMax (and a new pack of PrintFile pages) and found that I still had a good 30 feet of it in the loader all along. Doi! Spooled-off six rolls to potentially use in San Francisco today.

Paul Graham says Hackers and Painters just want to be loved.

Outta here.

Thimk

Eeek, this journal got labelled “the thinking photographers’ weblog” by Outwardly Normal 2, an apellation that’s already meme’d its way to joe jenett’s dailywebthing.

Guess that means I’d better get on the stick and add those extra twenty or thirty new entries to the strobe information page, huh.

Or maybe update the search dada page, which is also fallling behind by several weeks. Looking at today’s logs (how I noticed the link above), I find this lovely gem: “instrucions how to make a homemade bomb.” I am so happy to know that search term gets you here. I’d better pencil-in some time for visits and interviews from the FBI later in the day.

As a much easier way to merit this title, I’ll just post a link to Bee. He has some new stuff that I recommend highly. See it now, before you end up having to pay $40 to see it a Barnes & Noble.


Speaking of Bee’s site, he was the one who got me to realize the only sensible way to design web pages with slideshows — click on the picture to get to the next picture. Web designers, please take note of this very simple notion. Forcing the reader to hunt around for a “next” link (often disguised cleverly as a doorknob or some tiny arrangement of » signs), a link that usually jumps around the screen from page to page, is an unnessesary RSI-inducing evil, and one that’s easily avoided.

Seven Days in Romania

Not by me, sadly.

Cosmin Bumbut and six photographer friends of the 7 days photoclub have been spending just such a week annually for almost five years, in the more-traditional and remote parts of their country. The 2003 version, set in the village of Harnicesti, is due soon. The variation in styles is particularly interesting — each photographer has a different take.

~1 min read

Fragility

Ministry of Sound (C)2003 Kevin Bjorke Hoped to do some printing Thursday night for the second Contax G Print Exchange. I had planned to make silver prints for this but there’s been no time for the darkroom & a dozen prints are due in Scotland in two weeks. Back to the Epson.

I thought of using the photo at right — already posted in this journal once. A few days ago I posted it to Contax G and to my surprise it proved terrifically popular, rapidly attracting kudos and the highest site ratings I’d ever had there; before the jpeg was corrupted by a database glitch a couple of hours later. Only a handful of people ever saw more than a 150-pixel thumbnail. After two days of struggling and failing to be allowed to replace the file, I ended up deleting it.

An object lesson in impermanence, pride turned quickly to humiliation by a few errant lines of bad code.

Putting it in a print, I thought, might make some faintly-ironic statement about the fragilty of the web, its mercurial nature and the perhaps unfounded faith we place in it — replaced by a stiff archival chunk of heavy stock.

But I’ve since realized that it would be an empty gesture. Few had seen the photo in the first place, the irony would be lost. Pick a different shot.

The incident has, however, once again indicated to me that shared gallery sites are not always a healthy place for photos. I’d already abandoned placing photos on photo.net a long while back — too much emphasis on high volume and a demand for banality, photos that confirm and conform to the Kodak-brochure norms. I think from this point I should just keep my web photos on my own site, save for special situations.