2 l337 4 u

Courtney posted a link to the geek test. So I took it. Scored a 55-ish value, which I guess is “Extreme Geek.” Okay, I can live with that, but as I was going through the many, many checkboxes, I came to a realization or two about the general state of geekdom.

It’s hard to really know how the test is scored, but clearly it’s anime-deficient — no Belldandy in the “I Want…” list? What were they thinking? Seems hard to believe considering the source of such prime geek canon as Otaku No Video.

1 min read

The Best Picture Frame

…is one that helps make the picture.

For some time I’ve been scanning rolls (or downloading digicam sessions) and then, before doing any further editing or selections, playing the fresh photos as a random slideshow in GraphicConverter on the Mac. Not only can I watch them over and over at a large size, but the randomizing can reveal new connections and collisions on each cycle. I often leave it running for hours.

I’ve recently switched to a different slideshow program — Mac OS X itself. The “Pictures Folder” Screen Effects (screensaver) module not only cycles through folders of fresh-scanned pictures randomly, but it zooms, pans, and glides across them in a host of ways, revelaing even more possibilities as they lap-dissolve back and forth. The one fault: it won’t display empty areas, so the Apple screen aspect ratio, 4::3, is used. It doesn’t show 35mm images full-frame — only as cropped, panning slices.

Still, it’s a terrific picture frame. Tonight I’ve set it on a folder full of old contact sheets — hundreds of photos, old shots seen again for the first time. It is captivating, nostalgic, hallucinatory.

Crystallizing Method

This is a very long entry. I think I may move it to its own page after a couple of days, so it won’t overwhelm the rest of the journal.

In one of Mike Johnston’s first installments (http://www.luminous-landscape.com/columns/sm-02-04-31.shtml) of his column Sunday Morning, he writes that working methods are the most important thing that photographers never talk about. He then seems to stop talking about them in almost all subsequent columns. Go figure.

11 min read

Formulae

Three rolls Delta 400, 11.5mins Xtol 1::1 @ 20C

Got my new bulkroll of TMax (and a new pack of PrintFile pages) and found that I still had a good 30 feet of it in the loader all along. Doi! Spooled-off six rolls to potentially use in San Francisco today.

Paul Graham says Hackers and Painters just want to be loved.

Outta here.

Thimk

Eeek, this journal got labelled “the thinking photographers’ weblog” by Outwardly Normal 2, an apellation that’s already meme’d its way to joe jenett’s dailywebthing.

Guess that means I’d better get on the stick and add those extra twenty or thirty new entries to the strobe information page, huh.

Or maybe update the search dada page, which is also fallling behind by several weeks. Looking at today’s logs (how I noticed the link above), I find this lovely gem: “instrucions how to make a homemade bomb.” I am so happy to know that search term gets you here. I’d better pencil-in some time for visits and interviews from the FBI later in the day.

As a much easier way to merit this title, I’ll just post a link to Bee. He has some new stuff that I recommend highly. See it now, before you end up having to pay $40 to see it a Barnes & Noble.


Speaking of Bee’s site, he was the one who got me to realize the only sensible way to design web pages with slideshows — click on the picture to get to the next picture. Web designers, please take note of this very simple notion. Forcing the reader to hunt around for a “next” link (often disguised cleverly as a doorknob or some tiny arrangement of » signs), a link that usually jumps around the screen from page to page, is an unnessesary RSI-inducing evil, and one that’s easily avoided.