Natural Colors Part 3 (and counting)

Natural Colors Part 3 (and counting)

Two rolls of TXP 220, Xtol 1+1.

Joerg (via Mark) finds the great links again: Laurence Demaison’s B&W works are as unlike the typical wannabe-Weston or faux-HCB Leica-foto fare as you’re likely to find. And quite devoid of anything obvious that would tag them as made in 2005, 1955, 1895… I’d happily accept her work as an example of how new B&W need not be derivative or nostalgic or even self-consciously “new.” I am entirely delighted with it….

1 min read

Take Pictures

(C)2005

Two strong recommendations today for excellent but almost unknown photoblogs:

The first is a new blog attached to the established site of Clay Enos, who had previously been half of the StreetStudio team (the other half being fellow New York photographer Stephan Ghukfvin). Clay’s blog, begun late last year: Take Pictures.

~1 min read

Shazam

MJ BDay (C) 2005

Three 35mm rolls of Neopan 1600, three rolls of HP5+, all in Xtol 1+1.

As the saying goes, you’re never quite so fully aware as in the first second after the hammer comes down on your thumb.

~1 min read

tooth

tooth

Even if families are drowning in photos, perhaps it’s not such a bad thing, compared to the rest of the world. 3000 pictures of your three-year-old almost doesn’t compare when you realize that during that same year you’ve seen far, far more photos of Michael Jackson, Jennifer Aniston, and George Bush than you have of the people whose pictures you should value the most.

~1 min read

Artista Studio

With apologies to W. Evans (C) 2005 K Bjorke

Joerg wonders if our lives are drowning in pictures — or in his specific words, “photographic white noise.” Specifically, are people overwhelmed by their own portraiture? A child born today can expect thousands of photos to be emailed and archived on CDs before their first month of age. Byt the time they are old enough to pay attention, will they even be aware of any in particular?

This problem is not a newly-minted one, particularly comparing photos to paintings (and before 1850, the percentage of people who had portraits of familty members was miniscule). Berger’s Ways of Seeing hints a bit at it, as do Barthes’ Camera Lucida and Sontag’s On Photography. After many weeks of searching, I’ve finally tracked down a copy of Henri Cartier-Bresson’s 1952 The Decisive Moment (why hasn’t this book ever been reprinted?), and HCB comments directly to this issue, not as a problem but merely a characterisitic of the medium:

3 min read